EAT:ITH 2019 // ENVIRONMENTAL & ETHICAL DECISION MAKING FOR IRISH FOOD BUSINESSES

Details Price Qty
Research Contributionshow details + €120.00 (EUR)  

  • October 21, 2019
    9:00 am - 4:00 pm

WE ALL WANT TO MAKE THE RIGHT DECISIONS…BUT WHAT IS RIGHT?
A day of sustainable, environmental and ethical decision making for conscious food business owners.

 

The global food production system has been described as, “the art of turning oil into food”[1], faced by overlapping environmental, ecological and social crises it is necessary to try to go beyond this simplification and understand the complex interrelations of ecosystems, capital and human / non-human labour that go into producing the food we consume. This workshop is an attempt to begin that process by understanding the inputs and outputs through which a number of the most commonly used items in Irish cafes and food businesses are produced.

We are going to be faced with drastic changes in the coming years due to Climate Change and all the uncertain social, political and environmental transformations it will bring. We all want to be a business that does the right thing in the face of climate change and we know so many others that do too. But what is the right thing? How much conflicting information is there out there and how hard is it to make a change when everyone else around you is still ‘business as usual’. This one day workshop will be for conscious food business owners to come together and figure out some solutions that can benefit us all.

 

The Fumbally has commissioned a report to be undertaken by researcher Tom O’Dea (bio below) which will form the basis for this workshop on sustainable business practices and change implementation within small/medium food businesses in Ireland.

THIS REPORT WILL FOCUS ON THREE MAIN CHOICES:

1. VEGETABLES 2. PROTEIN 3. PACKAGING
Taking tomatoes as a case study we will look at the impact of imported conventional wholesale Irish conventional wholesale and Irish local organic grown tomatoes. Intensive beef reusable
Low intensive beef recyclable
dairy compostable
fish No take away option
soya  
pulses  

 

AND WILL ANALYSE EACH SECTION USING A RELATIVE INDEX OF FIVE MAIN HEADINGS:

    1. Global warming
      2. Pollution
      3. Ecosystem degradation (soil, land use, water)
      4. Labour
      5. Financial cost

The workshop will use this five axis rating system to show the relative impact of various product choices available to Irish food producers. The workshop will present secondary research gathered across academic, governmental, media and NGO sources as a way of allowing food producers to think through the complex interrelated choices that underpin their supply chain.

 

THE DAY / WORKSHOP WILL:

Be facilitated by Claire Faithorn (bio below) and divided into four segments.

  1. Findings and presentation of the research by Tom O’Dea and discussion on the findings.
  2. Talks on the realities of producing our own food in Ireland and the challenges of getting it to people with Fergal Anderson (farmer, founding member of An Talamh Beo) and others TBC

(LUNCH)

  1. Break out groups and exercises to process and disect the information from the morning.
  2. Talk on change implementation and what it takes to introduce changes into organisations and communities  with Ari Weinzweig (Zingermans, Ann Arbor, Michigan).

 

THE DAY / WORKSHOP WILL NOT:

Be offering a catch all model that we want people to implement. It will present information and a platform and opportunity to discuss these findings to come closer to solutions in ethical decision making. The research will NOT present definitive answers as to what any particular producer should do. In revealing the complexity of supply chains, what will become clear is that choices that create benefits in one area can produce negative effects in another. As with any ethical challenges it becomes necessary to recognise the values that guide our decisions and to make selective choices based on these. Understanding the role of these values in our decisions, what will become clear is that in attempts to combat these socio-enviro-technical crises it may not be a shortage of data that limits our actions. 

 

WANT TO BE A PART OF THE CONVERSATION?

We are asking for a donation of €120 per attendee to participate in this workshop and to share in the findings of the report. All money will go towards commissioning the report and producing the workshop and any additional funds raised will go towards further research in the area. The day includes lunch and tea/coffee breaks throughout the day. We would ask for only 1 attendee per company to allow for room for a wide range of businesses to attend. The Workshop has a Maximum capacity of 50 people.

 

Already confirmed contributors to the research and attendees are:

The Fumbally (Dublin)
Tang (Dublin)
Ard Bia (Galway)
The Cheese Press (Clare)
3FE (Dublin)
ITSA Group (Dublin)
Little Fox (Clare)
Hotel Doolin (Clare)
Meet Me in the Morning (Dublin)
Dublin Food Co-op
Camille Thai Take Away
Airfield House (Dublin)
White Mausu (Dublin)
Organico (Cork)
The Farmhouse Café (Dublin)
Proper Order (Dublin)
Little Bird (Dublin)
Gaillot & Grey (Dublin)
Camerino (Dublin)
Loam (Galway)
Cully & Sully (Cork)

 

 


 

TOM O DEA

Tom O’Dea is an artist and post-doctoral researcher in CONNECT Science Foundation Ireland’s research centre for future networks and communications. Tom’s research investigates the implications of complex socio-techinical systems. Before joining CONNECT Tom worked for ten years as a building and sustainability consultant engineer during which time he was involved in the design of some of Ireland’s most sustainable building projects as well as in sustainable post-disaster development projects. Tom holds a PhD in Computer Science and Art from Trinity College, a Master degree in Digital Media from NUIG and a Bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering.

 

 CLAIRE FAITHORN

Claire Faithorn is a freelance facilitator and non-formal educator. Claire runs programmes and workshops for organisations and groups to help change the way they work, create new projects, and find solutions to challenges. Claire’s background is in International Development and Social Justice, working with groups on leadership and changemaker programmes. Claire holds Postgraduate Certificates in Development Management, and Innovation, Enterprise and Entrepreneurship, and a Bachelor degree in Sociology.

 

 

FERGAL ANDERSON

Fergal Anderson runs Leaf and Root Farm, a small organic fruit and vegetable farm in East Galway. He is a founding member of An Talamh Beo, a new farmers organisation in Ireland, and has been building movements for Food Sovereignty for more than ten years, including three years in Brussels working for the International Peasant farmer’s organization La Via Campesina.

 

 

 

 

 ARI WEINZWEIG

Owner of Zingermans Community of businesses in Ann Arbor Michigan, Ari has been running an internationally renowned food business for 35 years. He has written 7 books on leadership, and holistic management and a specific pamphlet on bottom line  organisational change. He believes that change is vital to any organisation and an opportunity for improvement and advancement  rather than regression.

 

 

 

 

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